fbpx

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL U.S. ORDERS*

Postpartum Vaginal Care

Your body has just done something amazing: grow another human being. After 9 long months, you are probably excited to finally be home with your new baby. Much of your focus and energy during the coming weeks and months will be on baby, but remember that you also need to take care of yourself, too.

Your postpartum recovery won’t be just a few days. Fully recovering from pregnancy and childbirth can take months. While many women feel mostly recovered by 6-8 weeks, it may take longer than this to feel like yourself again. During this time, you may feel as though your body has turned against you. Try not to get frustrated. Remember that your body is not aware of your timelines and expectations. The best thing you can do for it is rest, eat well, and give yourself a break.

During this time, your hormones also will be fluctuating. You may not be thinking clearly and will be more emotional. Again, give yourself time for this to pass. However, if at any time you think about hurting yourself or your baby, tell someone.

Vaginal soreness

If you had a vaginal tear during delivery or your doctor made an incision, the wound might hurt for a few weeks. Extensive tears might take longer to heal. To ease discomfort while you’re recovering:

  • Sit on a pillow or padded ring.
  • Cool the area with an ice pack, or place a chilled witch hazel pad between a sanitary napkin and the area between your vaginal opening and anus (perineum).
  • Use a squeeze bottle to pour warm water over the perineum as you’re passing urine.
  • Sit in a warm bath just deep enough to cover your buttocks and hips for five minutes. Use cold water if you find it more soothing.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. Ask your health care provider about a numbing spray or cream, if needed.
  • Talk to your health care provider about using a stool softener or laxative to prevent constipation.

Tell your health care provider if you’re experiencing severe, persistent or increasing pain, which could be a sign of infection.

Vaginal discharge

After delivery, you’ll begin to shed the superficial mucous membrane that lined your uterus during pregnancy. You’ll have vaginal discharge made up of this membrane and blood for weeks. The discharge will be red and heavy for the first few days. Then it will taper, become increasingly watery and change from pinkish brown to yellowish white.

Contact your health care provider if you have heavy vaginal bleeding — soaking a pad in less than an hour — especially if it’s accompanied by pelvic pain, a fever or tenderness.

Credit: Familydoctor.org

Like this article?

Share on facebook
Share on Facebook
Share on twitter
Share on Twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on Linkdin
Share on pinterest
Share on Pinterest

Leave a comment